Corning: computer manufacturer uses Gorilla glass

Corning Inc. and Austin, Texas-based Motion Computing Inc. reported on 6 October 2009 that Motion would use Corning“s Gorilla speciality glass in two of its laptop notebook computers.
Motion, a spec…

Corning Inc. and Austin, Texas-based Motion Computing Inc. reported on 6 October 2009 that Motion would use Corning“s Gorilla speciality glass in two of its laptop notebook computers. Motion, a specialist in the production of durable and lightweight computers, is informing clients about the speciality glass as part of its marketing. The composition of Gorilla Glass, a thin-sheet glass designed to function as a cover glass for portable display device screens, allows a deeper layer of chemical strengthening than that of other strengthened glasses. According to vice president of Corning“s Technical Materials division, Mark Matthews, the end result is a display glass cover that is scratch resistant and almost unbreakable. Corning Inc.“s high-strength Gorilla glass was developed for auto windshield glass in the 1960s, but was discarded as there were concerns that an unbreakable windshield would cause more head injuries that it would prevent. However, about two years ago, customers of Corning started to speak about their need for a stronger glass. Gorilla glass was therefore reintroduced to the market and is expected to see about USD 100 million in sales in 2009. The two PCs from Motion using Corning“s Gorilla glass are notebooks designed for mobile use in the health care, construction, field service or manufacturing industries. According to Matthews, 12 major brand names – including Dell, Samsung, LG and Motorola – also use Gorilla glass, but the only company to mention the use of Gorilla glass in marketing is Motion Computing. He also said that Corning is looking into industrial uses for its high-strength display glass. “The glass isn“t part of the display but it protects the display,” said Matthews. “So banking machines, vending machines, GPS units, you can use the glass on any devices with screens you touch.”