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Avery Dennison to upgrade plant

US-based adhesive labels maker Avery Dennison said it could be investing as much as US$ 3.5 million in its local Fasson Roll Division plant in Indiana within the next two years.
The company is spendi…

US-based adhesive labels maker Avery Dennison said it could be investing as much as US$ 3.5 million in its local Fasson Roll Division plant in Indiana within the next two years. The company is spending US$ 1.5 million upgrading one of its two gigantic adhesive-application machines at the plant. The changes will speed up the machine“s operation by 50%, enough to increase the facility“s production by 25%. The industry“s technology has grown faster since the mid-1980s, and the upgrade is intended “to keep this plant competitive,” said Doug McKinzie, plant manager. “We want to be competitive and keep the jobs here in Fort Wayne.” The upgrade is expected to be completed by August. In addition to increasing the speed of the 70 yard-long machine, the upgrade will reduce its downtime. Its reliability will be improved, and the time required to change the 79-inch-wide rolls of paper the machine uses will be reduced. Part of the machine coats paper with adhesive and part of it coats paper with silicone, so it will pull apart from the adhesive easily. The two types of paper are rolled together into a roll of sticker or label paper. The silicone is baked on for two seconds at 300 degrees, and the adhesive is baked on for 15 seconds at 200 degrees. Part of the process involves wetting the baked paper slightly to cool it and restore moisture so the paper does not become brittle. The plant has also made a request to the company for a US$ 1 million replacement of a splitting machine that cuts adhesive paper from massive rolls into the proper size. It has also requested a US$ 1 million upgrade of its dock to improve its shipping capabilities. If the requests are approved, the splitting machine could be replaced this year and the dock upgraded next year. The plant employs 180 workers, and the new splitting machine would call for an increase of about 15 employees, McKinzie said. The investment will increase the speed with which the plant can respond to orders. That is important to its business, because some customers need the orders filled the same day they are placed, he added. But the capacity increase is needed at the plant primarily because demand for its products is growing about 10% annually.

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