Anchor Glass celebrates 110th anniversary

To celebrate its 110th anniversary, Anchor Glass Container Corp., Mould Division, hosted an open house at its facility, which included factory tours free of charge for participants, who will also be g…

To celebrate its 110th anniversary, Anchor Glass Container Corp., Mould Division, hosted an open house at its facility, which included factory tours free of charge for participants, who will also be given a free commemorative anniversary bottle, designed by local craftsmen and made for the event. The third annual AGCC Employees“ Charity Car Show also took place during the celebrations. The mould division makes the moulds used in the company“s eight glassmaking facilities with time, patience, precision and the mould must be able to withstand the intense heat used to make glass containers. “Anything you might see in glass could be cast in the foundry. It“s (a rough casting) brought to the facility and the machine process begins. We put on final dimensions from a rough casting to finish glass,” said Mike Emmert, president of local 121 T. The mould-making process begins with a raw casting, usually made of brass, but iron moulds also are made. The casting moves to the slabbing operator, where a male and female mould piece is put together. The first machining takes about 30 minutes to reduce the mould. It must be precise since the mould will make about 300 glass containers per minute, Emmert explained. In 1987 Anchor Glass Container Corp. was planning to close the local plant, but then decided to expand and move the local plant to the industrial park and its current location. Economic grants, tax abatements, a 15-year exemption from real estate taxes, exemption from half its personal property taxes for 10 years and other incentives were offered to keep the facility in Zanesville. The skill and dedication of the existing work force did the rest. “These people really are good. We wouldn“t be here if it wasn“t for the people, the Port Authority and the commissioners. The primary reasons for the shop“s long term survival have been its work force“s skill and dedication to the craft of glass mould making and also labour and management working together to ensure that those craft skills are passed on properly from one generation of mould makers to the next,” Emmert said. “The next reason for the business“s longevity is the unwavering support that we have received from the community and its leadership, both past and present. In 1988 our new facility arose as Muskingum County“s first Port Authority project. Anchor Glass Zanesville could have easily moved to another location, and with it would have went the multi-million dollar annual payroll, medical benefits that help support our hospitals and medical community and many of its employees who are good contributing citizens of our area,” Emmert said. “You“ve got to admit there“s something about holding a glass bottle in your hand,” Emmert said.