Corning introduces new Iris Glass

Corning’s most recent development – Iris Glass – which can significantly reduce the thickness of a liquid crystal display TV set, making it as thin as a smartphone, was introduced last week at the International Consumer Electronics Show.

Corning Inc. introduced its latest high tech glass product last week at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
Corning’s Iris Glass is a substrate that can significantly reduce the thickness of a liquid crystal display TV set, making it as thin as a smartphone.
All LCDs require a backlight to generate images. Light-guide plates are an integral part of the back light assembly, distributing and directing LED light through the TV.
The primary innovation for Iris Glass is its outstanding transmission, which delivers bright pictures and proves glass is a viable light-guided plate material.
“Initially, the display industry wanted to use glass LGPs when edge-lit LEDs first entered the market,” said John Bayne, general manager and vice president, Corning High Performance Displays and Advanced Glass Innovations. “However, the transmission was unacceptable, so panel makers defaulted to plastic.”
Although plastic’s transmission is adequate, it has limitations as an LGP. It lacks rigidity, which impacted panel makers’ ability to develop thinner TVs. To compensate, panel makers incorporated extra structural components, adding weight and bulk to the conventional edge-lit LCD TV. Further, because plastic expands when exposed to humidity, manufacturers also needed to increase the size of the framing area of the TV’s exterior, known as the bezel.
Iris Glass is 36 times stiffer than plastic, freeing panel makers to design TVs that are less than 10 millimeters thick. Iris Glass delivers 90 percent lower thermal expansion, enabling narrower bezels for sleeker designs.
Using Iris Glass as an LGP means panel makers can now add a new layer o