Wrightstyle puts lorry bomb test online

UK-based Wrightstyle, specializing in the design of glazing systems to withstand terrorist attack, has put video footage of a successful and groundbreaking test against a lorry bomb on YouTube.
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UK-based Wrightstyle, specializing in the design of glazing systems to withstand terrorist attack, has put video footage of a successful and groundbreaking test against a lorry bomb on YouTube. Different views of the test can be seen at www.youtube.com/user/wrightstyle001. Recent contracts of Wrightstyle include the Dubai Metro, Durban“s new FIFA World Cup stadium, and the US Marines museum in the US. Using new media as part of our marketing is all about making Wrightstyle as accessible as possible, and educating architects that glass in buildings can be made safe from terrorist attack, said Jane Embury, Wrightstyle. The message that we have been trying to convey to architects is that, if a system such as ours is used for the external glazing, the glazing system will look no different from conventional curtain walling, said Jane Embury. Wrightstyle“s landmark test, which took place at a specialist site in the UK, involved the system being subjected to the equivalent of 500 kilos of TNT, recognized as an average-sized lorry bomb. The strength of Wrightstyle“s system was achieved by means of a glazing technique that bonds the glass to its framing support. This means that in an explosion, the components work together to safely absorb the shock and retain the glazing elements. During the test, the simulated lorry bomb attack was immediately followed by a simulated car bomb attack using 100 kilos of TNT. The lorry bomb was detonated 75 metres from the test rig, whilst the car bomb was detonated at a distance of 20 metres, thus producing a higher pressure loading and shock on the faade – and was also successful. We may not have yet taken explosives from the hands of terrorists. But for the occupants of those buildings that incorporate the latest blast-resistant steel glazing systems, we have taken away an equally potent weapon: the glass itself, said Jane Embury.