O-I in beer bottle recall

The Boston Beer Co. issued a recall of around 25% of the beer bottles it recently shipped after it discovered faults that might cause bits of glass to break off and fall into the bottles.
Michelle S…

The Boston Beer Co. issued a recall of around 25% of the beer bottles it recently shipped after it discovered faults that might cause bits of glass to break off and fall into the bottles. Michelle Sullivan, a spokeswoman for the South Boston brewer of Samuel Adams beers, said on 7 April 2008 that the bottles were supplied by Owens-Illinois Inc.“s plant in Auburn, New York. However, in a press release on 8 April 2008, Owens-Illinois said its investigations had indicated that the bottles supplied to the brewer were manufactured to O-I“s normal manufacturing specifications and tolerances. O-I said it would continue to investigate the root cause of the issue, which was unknown. Ms. Sullivan said the company does not yet know how many bottles are affected. But she said the company estimates that fewer than one million bottles need to be recalled. About a quarter of the company“s beer bottles are supplied by the Auburn plant. Company executives believe that fewer than 1% of the bottles from the Auburn plant are defective. But they cannot tell where those bottles went, so they are recalling all of them to be safe. “Every one of their bottles is suspect”, Ms. Sullivan said of Owen- Illinois“ Auburn plant. “We don“t want beer on the shelves that doesn“t meet our standards. That“s our No. 1 priority”. Boston Beer had not received any consumer complaints of any injury related to the defect, Ms. Sullivan said on 7 April. She said no draft beers or Twisted Tea bottles were affected. This is the first recall in the company“s 24-year history, she said. The problem first emerged on 28 March 2008 during routine quality inspections at Boston Beer“s Cincinnati brewery, although the Owens-Illinois bottles were shipped to all four breweries where Samuel Adams beers are bottled, Ms. Sullivan said. Once the problem was discovered, inspectors then tested thousands of bottles to identify the origin of the defect, she said. “We had to figure out exactly what was happening”, she said. “We just learned over the (past) weekend that it was a problem from this one bottle plant in Auburn, New York”. The affected bottles have the following markings: The letter “N”, followed by the number “35”, followed by the letters “OI”. Consumers who have already purchased the bottles are advised to throw them away and seek a refund from the company. The company has directed the recalled bottles to be removed from stores and wholesalers to hold the affected bottles in their warehouses.