NGA chairman urges rethink on energy rating system

National Glass Association chairman Rod Van Buskirk released a position statement to the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) on 8 November 2007 to be presented at its membership meeting. The s…

National Glass Association chairman Rod Van Buskirk released a position statement to the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) on 8 November 2007 to be presented at its membership meeting. The statement urged the group to focus on encouraging the development of new energy efficient products rather than developing an ill-advised rating system that duplicates work already being done by the private sector. “What the NFRC claims it is trying to accomplish for commercial building fenestration is already being done every day by design professionals and engineers, and has been for years”, said Mr. Van Buskirk, president and owner of Bacon & Van Buskirk in Champaign, Illinois. “This is just another costly and time-consuming layer of bureaucracy that will not improve energy efficiency or conservation”. The NFRC has proposed a controversial plan to use computer technology to create a Component Modeling (CMA) program that would compute the energy characteristics of various types of commercial building fenestration and assign an energy-efficiency rating to the fenestration. Mr. Van Buskirk was slated to formally present the NGA“s official position on the CMA program at NFRC“s annual membership meeting, but was unable to attend due to illness. In lieu of his appearance, the position paper was sent to NFRC representatives to be released to all NFRC members. “CMA labeling only adds costs and impedes the commercial building process. While the glass industry has undertaken significant efforts to work within the system to craft a more workable proposal, our concerns have been largely ignored,” Mr. Van Buskirk continued. “The bottom line is that the program as currently crafted will not provide an accurate and efficient format to rate the energy impact of commercial fenestration products and will instead place unnecessary time and financial demands on the commercial glazing industry”.