Glencairn Crystal: orders in hard times

After picking up a marketing title at the National Business Awards for Scotland in September 2006, Glencairn Crystal has also announced that it has secured major deals in China, India and Russia worth…

After picking up a marketing title at the National Business Awards for Scotland in September 2006, Glencairn Crystal has also announced that it has secured major deals in China, India and Russia worth almost six figures. The deals, which include orders for the firm“s unique range of whisky glasses, are with some of the world“s largest importers of Scotch whisky. Director Paul Davidson said: “Our first volume orders have been completed to India, China and Russia and were worth just under GBP 100,000. We are well established in Europe and North America now so this is a very exciting time for us. We are planning to continue this expansion and we are delighted to fly the Scottish flag for quality and style across the globe.” Davidson added that the deals were “great recognition for Glencairn Crystal.” He said: “It clearly demonstrates that there is a strong, positive future for this industry in Scotland, in contrast to the demise of Edinburgh Crystal and Caithness Glass earlier this year. By continuing to invest in product development, working closely with partners such as the whisky industry, we have maintained and grown our position as the UK“s most innovative and market driven crystal and giftware firms.” The firm employs more than 20 people at its East Kilbride and Broxburn locations. Earlier in 2006, the family business also received a Queens Award for Enterprise: Innovation, which is one of Britain“s most coveted commercial awards, which recognized the firm“s international marketing of the Glencairn Glass, a unique product designed for malt whisky. Glencairn supplies more than one million glasses a year worldwide and has consistently increased its turnover year-on-year for the past five years. However, while times are good at Glencairn, the Scottish glass and ceramics industry is suffering. Edinburgh Crystal, the country“s oldest glassmaker, fell into administration in July 2006 after years of losses. So far, the company“s administrators have been forced to cut 270 jobs out of 430 staff. A buyer for the firm has not yet been found. In August 2006, Caithness Glass, whose parent firm is Edinburgh Crystal, went under citing major changes in the glass market during the past 10 years as the cause. Since then, Selkirk Glass has also fallen into administration resulting in the loss of 34 jobs.