Glass Imploder cuts waste

The five-star Grosvenor House in Mayfair, London accumulates up to 20 660-litre containers of empty champagne and wine bottles each day. A recent environmental review at the hotel has seen it adopt a …

The five-star Grosvenor House in Mayfair, London accumulates up to 20 660-litre containers of empty champagne and wine bottles each day. A recent environmental review at the hotel has seen it adopt a glass implosion unit which has drastically reduced the number of expensive waste vehicle journeys to and from its site by taking advantage of a unique British glass implosion process. The patented Imploder, invented by Dorset firm Krysteline, renders the glass sharp free, making the end product suitable for use as a recycled aggregate, or for further processing into high-value products for industry. Moreover, noise levels are reduced during collection since the sound of tipping imploded glass is similar to that of tipping sand. Implosion is a mechanically induced, high-speed process, similar to the effect of an opera singer shattering a wine glass when hitting a very high note, except that implosion shatters the glass inwards on itself, and creates no shards or sharp edges. The Imploder densifies glass up to 5% of its original volume and produces a range of fraction sizes from 0.2mm up to 16mm, but size range can be varied towards smaller or larger fractions. George Mcintosh, executive steward at Grosvenor House, said: The impact since using the Imploder has been tremendous – it“s clean and safe and has reduced man hours hugely. It has also reduced collections.