Corning Museum of Glass: new Sasanian glass catalogue

A new publication from The Corning Museum of Glass now offers the largest and most varied catalogue of Sasanian glass available in print. Beyond the eastern frontier of the Roman Empire lay the territ…

A new publication from The Corning Museum of Glass now offers the largest and most varied catalogue of Sasanian glass available in print. Beyond the eastern frontier of the Roman Empire lay the territory of the Sasanians, a dynasty that originated in southern Iran. Between the early third and mid-seventh centuries, the Sasanians ruled a vast empire that extended from Mesopotamia to parts of Central Asia. Some Sasanian glass was similar in form and decoration to Roman production, but other pieces were made in a specifically Iranian style. Because very few pieces of Sasanian glass available in collections today were excavated in controlled archeological excavations, little has been published about them. “Sasanian and Post-Sasanian Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass” by Dr. David Whitehouse, the Museum“s executive director and curator of ancient and Islamic glass, catalogues 72 objects from the collection of The Corning Museum of Glass that were made in the Sasanian Empire or in the Sasanian style. “This book catalogues the collection at Corning in an effort to offer a starting point for understanding an often neglected, but important era in glassmaking history,” says Whitehouse. “A handful of archeological reports aside, very few publications deal exclusively with this subject.” Divided into eight sections based on technique, the book provides color photographs and illustrations, with detailed descriptions and commentaries for each object. Two appendixes provide information on fragments collected from three archeological sites in central Iraq and chemical analyses of Sasanian glass, including objects in the collection at Corning. The volume also includes concordances, an index, and an extensive bibliography. Whitehouse has published widely on archeology in Europe and the Middle East, and on Roman, Islamic, and medieval glass. He has directed excavations at Siraf on the Persian Gulf, and is the former director of The British Institute of Afghan Studies in Kabul, Afghanistan, and The British School in Rome. “Sasanian and Post-Sasanian Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass” is published by The Corning Museum of Glass in association with Hudson Hill Press. It is available through the Museum“s GlassMarket.