CMOG showcases audience favorites

A life-size figure in an evening dress, a dramatic cast-glass pyramid seemingly lit from within, carrots preserved in glass: these are among the art works that have captivated visitors to The Corning …

A life-size figure in an evening dress, a dramatic cast-glass pyramid seemingly lit from within, carrots preserved in glass: these are among the art works that have captivated visitors to The Corning Museum of Glass time and again. They are also three of 41 contemporary glass objects featured in the upcoming exhibition, Favorites from the Contemporary Glass Collection. This survey of audience favorites will be on view at the Museum from 1 March 2009 through 3 January 2010. “The sheer volume and scale of many of the works in the exhibition, as well as the astonishing variety of forms, color, and techniques represented, underscore the allure of the contemporary glass in our collection”, says David Whitehouse, the Museum“s executive director. To identify the visitor favorites, the Museum surveyed its education staff, docents, security guards, and others who interact with visitors on a daily basis. The selections range from a painting-inspired still life in glass by Beth Lipman, to Kiki Smith“s Steuben Tattoo Vase to a family portrait comprised of “molecular” forms by artist Jill Reynolds. The exhibition also includes a few recently acquired “favorites” such as 30/06/2007, a sculpture by German artist Josepha Gasch-Muche made from broken liquid crystal display (LCD) substrate glass. “This exhibition brings together some of my favorite objects, as well as the art works that are repeatedly singled out by our visitors. People are drawn to contemporary glass by the unexpected expressions that they discover are possible in the material, by the versatility and skill of the artists, and by the beauty of the objects”, said Tina Oldknow, curator of modern glass. “The artists represented in Favorites take an innovative approach to the medium, and their work conveys a freshness of thought. I hope that these objects will surprise the visitors who have not yet seen them, and that our visitors who know the collection will enjoy seeing some of their favorite pieces in a different kind of presentation”. The public is encouraged to explore and discuss the objects in the show on the Museum“s website, www.cmog.org/favorites Beginning 1 March 2009, the site will offer visitors the opportunity to comment on which pieces are their favorites and why. The exhibition is part of a larger year-long series of contemporary glass exhibitions, which includes Masters of Studio Glass: Frantiek Vzner (through 22 March 2009); Masters of Studio Glass: Richard Craig Meitner (4 April – 18 October 2009); Voices of Contemporary Glass: The Heineman Collection (16 May 2009 – 3 January 2010).