CANADA: Investigation of ARG windshields from China

PPG Canada Inc. recently said the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) will initiate a dumping investigation of automotive replacement glass (ARG) windshields from the People“s Republic of China….

PPG Canada Inc. recently said the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) will initiate a dumping investigation of automotive replacement glass (ARG) windshields from the People“s Republic of China. “The Government of Canada“s decision to initiate this investigation is encouraging news … because the Canadian ARG windshield industry has been beleaguered by a flood of unfairly traded Chinese imports,” said Mark Shoemaker, director of finance and human resources for PPG Canada. Under international trade treaties and Canada“s Special Import Measures Act (SIMA), dumping occurs when goods are sold to importers in Canada at prices that are lower than the selling price of comparable goods in the country of export, or when goods are sold to Canada at unprofitable prices. “Our people are willing and able to compete with imports that are fairly traded in compliance with the World Trade Organization (WTO) Antidumping Agreement and Canadian law,” Shoemaker said. “The fact that our complaint is strongly supported by a Montreal windshield manufacturer, Lamiver Inc., demonstrates that dumped Chinese windshields are an industry-wide problem.” The CCRA and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (CITT) will proceed with their investigations to determine the degree of dumping and injury to the Canadian industry. The investigation process typically takes about seven months and will conclude with a CITT injury hearing where interested parties can present their case. If dumping is found to cause injury to the Canadian industry, the imported Chinese windshields will be subject to an antidumping duty. PPG Canada, which is headquartered in Toronto, is a subsidiary of Pittsburgh-based PPG Industries, a global supplier of coatings, glass, fibre glass and chemicals.